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Trouble So Hard: Moby On His New Memoir & The 20th Anniversary Of ‘Play’

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Moby On His New Memoir &'Play' 20th Anniversary trouble-so-hard-moby-his-new-memoir-20th-anniversary-%E2%80%98play%E2%80%99 Trouble So Hard: Moby On His New Memoir & The 20th Anniversary Of ‘Play’ "'Play' was supposed to fail and the fact it did exactly the opposite of that was very surprising and still to this day seems anomalous," says the electronic DJ/singer Dan Weiss GRAMMYs May 20, 2019 - 12:17 pm Moby is famous for two things: Making electronic music and not making electronic music. This contradiction has made for a strange career that opened electrifying raves with early floor anthems like “Go” as a DJ, before cycling through genres as disparate as ambient and punk rock not too many years later. It also serves as a fitting setup to his fifth album Play , which indeed famously turned non-electronic music—namely sampled field recordings of gospel hymns from Alan Lomax’s Sounds of the South collection—into electronic music. Several of those tracks (“Natural Blues,” “Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad?”), along with a couple that Moby sang himself (“Porcelain,” “South Side”) became huge hits all over the world. But every one of Play ’s 18 tracks (even many quiet, obscure instrumentals) was licensed for commercial use, saturating the year 1999 so effectively that the album eventually climbed to 12 million copies sold. As a result, the album crowned Moby with the best-selling electronic album of all-time. Reading Moby’s new memoir Then It Fell Apart will tell you what a shocking turn of events this was, rising from the commercial wreckage of his 1997 hard-rock experiment Animal Rights to a surreal level of fame that involved dating Natalie Portman and beefing with Eminem . And uh, brushing against Donald Trump at parties. The Recording Academy spoke to the man himself about how Play’s very millennial fusion of house music and gospel roots could’ve ended up sounding like Pantera , how the landmark album fits into today’s discussions of cultural appropriation and more. Play changed your life 20 years ago; it’s the all-time best-selling electronic album. What does that mean for you? The context was what made it so surprising. Before it was released, my career was in the toilet. The album that came out before Play , Animal Rights , had just been an across-the-board failure. Bad sales, bad reviews, no one came to the shows. My expectations, my manager’s expectations and the record label’s expectations were so low. Richard Sanders, who was running V2 [Records] at the time, said he thought that Play might sell 50,000 copies, and I scoffed at it. “Oh, it will never sell 50,000 copies.” It’s not only the fact that it went on to sell absurdly well, but also that Play became this weird lifestyle record… the stories people told me about the ways in which they listened to it. I had people telling me that they had multiple copies of it, one for their car, one for their home, one for their parents’ home. Elton John told me he had a copy of it in every home and apartment that he had in the world. I made it in my bedroom, it was mixed poorly. It was released at the time when Eminem and *NSync and Backstreet Boys were topping the charts. It was supposed to fail and the fact it did exactly the opposite of that was very surprising and still to this day seems anomalous. If you remove the albums Play , 18 , and Hotel , my career and sales make a lot more sense. Those records really are the baffling exceptions to everything else. You’ve said that you didn’t expect Play to do better than Animal Rights . But clearly you made a very different record from Animal Rights and making a punk album was kind of an obvious risk, no? This might seem disingenuous or overly naïve, but I assumed all but the most conservative pop musicians made creative choices based on their enthusiasm for the music they’re making. When Joe Strummer decided to start playing reggae and hip-hop, to me, it made perfect sense. When David Bowie went from being a folk artist to a glam-rock artist to a disco artist and a new wave artist, it all seemed challenging and interesting because he was excited by these genres. Same thing when John Lennon started the Plastic Ono Band and started releasing crazy noise records, or when Lou Reed made Metal Machine Music . I thought this was part of the musician’s job description to be inspired by different genres and release records that might be challenging but were a product of that inspiration. READ: Ruben Blades & Making Movies Team Up On "Delilah," Co-Written By Lou Reed Yeah, but the sales figures for Metal Machine Music were very at odds with its eventual influence. I didn’t expect Animal Rights to be successful, per se. But the fact that it was crucified and maligned was weirdly disappointing. That was sort of when the blinders came off; that even in the world of indie-rock and dance music, it was way more conservative than I thought it was. I thought that it was a critics’ job to support experimentation even if they didn’t like it, the Lester Bangs approach. Were you specifically setting out to make a dance record again after that? At the end of the Animal Rights tour, I was playing Glastonbury for the first time and it was grim. It was in the middle of the afternoon, I was playing in the pouring rain, there was a sea of mud in the front of the stage, the tent was maybe 20 percent full. On the tour bus, I was talking to my managers. I had just been listening to the most recent Pantera album and I told them, “So, for my next record, I want to take what I did on Animal Rights and go harder, I want to tune down the way Sepultura and Pantera are all tuning down really far and just make it as dark and hard and almost unlistenable as possible, doubling down on the aggression of Animal Rights . And my manager Barry said something so simple: “That’s okay, but people really do like your electronic music.” If he had said “Your electronic music sells better,” the old punk rocker in me would’ve rejected it. But I suddenly realized in an almost existential way, if you’re going to release music and try to communicate with people… one, try not to waste their time and two, give them something that they can derive joy from. So in that moment, I thought, if I’m going to make super-dark death metal, I can do that on my own time. And that was what led to trying to make a more melodic electronic album. But you also had low expectations for the sales of Play . How did you end up underestimating pop songs like “South Side”? In some ways, that’s the weirdest song on the record because it’s not a weird song. Every other song on the record [has] something abnormal. The song “Run On” does have a verse/chorus structure, but it involves vocals that were recorded in the 1950s. “South Side” is the closest thing to a pop/rock song and as a result, I didn’t want to put it on the record. I thought that “Porcelain” and “Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad?” and “South Side” should be left off because they just didn’t feel substantial enough to me. But there was no thought of making pop music or making commercially viable music. I thought I was a has-been, I didn’t think that was even an option. Never once in the making of Play did I think that anyone would hear it or buy it. You’d sampled before, of course, but was it a challenge to put new arrangements on an already-existing traditional song like “Run On?” The challenge was actually more technical. This was all done pre-Pro Tools, a lot of really getting into the nuts and bolts of the Akai samplers, a little bit of time-stretching. Now in Pro Tools it would’ve been the easiest thing in the world. But back then, you had to do all your editing on the tiny little screen of an Akai sampler. When you watch an old movie, you’re just amazed at what they were able to do when they were cutting film. Making music before Pro Tools it was the same thing; it took a lot longer to get something to the place where it sounded normal. Specifically that song “Run On” because there’s so many vocals, and obviously they did not record it to a click track, there’s no solid tempo in that song. As an engineer, that was the hardest song to make on the entire record. “Honey” was actually pretty easy because they’re clapping, which made for an ad hoc click track. And luckily, they had really good timing. Did you struggle with worrying that you might offend the source material? No, because I didn’t expect anyone to listen to it. Right. If someone had said, “You’re making an album that’s going to sell 12 million copies,” I might have given it a second thought. From the time when electronic musicians started sampling, there was only two criteria for sample-based music: Is it good? And are you gonna get sued? I’m not saying the criteria of historical sensitivity was invalid, just that it was never part of the conversation. Of course, the world is a very different place now and people have a lot more understanding of historical sensitivity. I asked Chris Rock, “As a black man, what do you think?” And he said, “It’s good music, that’s all that matters.” I don’t know if he would feel that way today, but in 1999, that’s what he said to me at the MTV Awards. READ: Why The Millennium Tour Matters in 2019 There’s been a lot of debate about cultural appropriation in the 2010s. Has that affected your feelings about Play at all, or have you had any substantive conservations about it since then? No. I have not. I’m not saying I shouldn’t have those conversations or that I won’t have them, but as far I know, you asking me is the closest I’ve come to a conversation about it. In that case, any thoughts you want to share on the fly? Culture is evolving and it’s fluid. I’m sure if I sat down with someone like Cornel West, I’m sure they’d have a different perspective on Play and I’m sure that I’d agree with their perspective. I was in high school at the time and I remember reading press about Play summing up the century by tying those Lomax field recordings of hymns and gospel from the beginning of it, to the beats of the Y2K era. Did this future-meets-past thing ever cross your mind? No, no. [ Laughs .] There was no meta context or anything academic in the making of it. There was simply… the only way I can describe it is, like, emotional utility. Did it resonate with me emotionally? That was the sole criteria for evaluating the music when I was making the record. And we didn’t have a licensing plan. People still ask me about the licensing of Play , which seems almost like a cute nostalgic question. Now every musician in the world will bend over backwards to license their kidneys. But no, I just made a record I liked and my managers liked. You’ve had a complicated relationship with Christianity, were the gospel samples on Play significant to you in a religious way at all? Ahh… not in terms of any creed or dogma or denomination, just more so the human condition and emotional expression. Even “Natural Blues,” which is a lament to the divine, to me it was much more about the quality of the voice and the expression of longing and sadness in the vocals in the words, rather than trying to slot it into a Christian or secular tradition. After reading Then It Fell Apart , the videos from this era felt a little darker to me. “South Side,” “Bodyrock” and eventually “We Are All Made of Stars” all express a kind of discomfort with the limelight. I like being an agreeable interview subject, but the video directors made most of the creative decisions. I’d love to take credit for “South Side” and “We Are All Made of Stars,” but the director, Joseph Kahn, those are his videos. It was just interesting that so many of them commented on fame to a degree. Even the “Natural Blues” video has this preemptive look back at your career. You missed – which is not surprising because no one really saw it – what I think is the best of all the videos from Play , and the most entertaining look at the world of fame, “Find My Baby.” I came up with the plotline for it: “The world’s youngest boy band.” It’s a boy band throwing whiskey bottles and having debaucherous hotel times, but they’re one and a half years-old. It was released at the end of the Play album cycle so very few people saw it, but I think it’s really funny. I hadn’t really thought of it until you mentioned it, but there is a through line in those videos, criticism of the world of fame in both a lighthearted and cautionary way. Which brings me to you and Eminem meeting at this very bizarre nexus of two different kinds of celebrity. I wanted to ask if you still have the drawing Eminem gave you of himself strangling you? Oh yeah, of course. I framed it. Jul 18, 2018 – 7:41 pm Take The 'On Location' Tour Of Los Angeles READ: Go 'On Location' In Los Angeles With Moby, Jade Novah, Nick Hexum & More You were maybe his most bizarre target during a time when anyone was in his crosshairs. Have you come around to what he was trying to do artistically? Honestly, I don’t know his music that well. I know the hit singles, but I’ve never delved too deep into the album tracks. It was clear to me from day one that he was very smart, very talented, and very aware. In hindsight, it sort of frustrates and saddens me that we were pitted against each other because I think our upbringings were very similar: scared kids in dysfunctional, single-parent households. I think a lot of misogyny and homophobia in popular culture comes from dumb, unevolved bigots. I don’t think Eminem is any of those things, for him it was almost like performance art. He’s certainly not the best poster child for me criticizing those things. I don’t need any more feuds, but I can think of a few thousand other musicians who are probably now wearing MAGA hats and watching Fox News, who probably made a lot more egregious music. It’s funny that Elton John’s got your record in every property he owns, and then he’s singing with Eminem onstage at the GRAMMYs. For him, both your messages worked. Uh-huh. Then the Trump family appears in your memoir in random ways, particularly that “knob-touch” story . How did you end up in so many situations with the Trumps? I grew up very, very poor. I longed for legitimacy and acceptance and validation, so in the 2000s, as I started getting invited to fancy events and parties, I jumped at the chance to ingratiate myself with wealthy New Yorkers. But I also sort of use the Trumps as a narrative device in the book because there’s something really wrong with them. No one in the Trump family is ever allowed to serve on the board of a charity again because of the way they ran their foundation was so dishonest and so corrupt. That’s disgusting. So in an emblematic way, they’re representative of the corruption I was experiencing. The moment you say you’re at a party with Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, you’re establishing that things have gone terribly wrong. You publicly stated/posted a couple years ago that you have sources who know things we don’t about Trump. Has the Mueller report illuminated any of that or is there still plenty to come? The Mueller report isn’t even the tip of the iceberg, it’s like the picture of the hair above the tip of the iceberg. The depths of corruption regarding Trump and his businesses, his administration, his foundation, it’s so much darker. The Republicans are basically water-skiing behind the Titanic. How did you come to receive this info? I’m just going on what I’ve heard, that Trump was installed as a Russian asset. Among the intelligence community, that’s just a given, no one even questions that anymore. Do you have personal ties to the intelligence community? I don’t include this in the book, but after college I had a relationship with a woman whose father was one of the heads of the CIA and I’ve been friends with a lot of those people since then. And years of touring, you just end up meeting people on tour. I don’t know that many people in that world, but there does seem to be a complete consensus that Trump is completely corrupt and his only saving grace is that he’s dumb and incompetent and has no control over his emotions. We should all be grateful for the fact that he’s not Putin. If Trump were bright and could regulate his emotions, he would be truly terrifying. You also find yourself talking to Putin’s daughter at one point in the memoir. This was the mid-2000s so I had met plenty of heads of state, children of heads of state and I was also very drunk. I just thought she was very nice, this normal, soft-spoken person. Maybe in my drunken haze that wasn’t true. Twenty years later, do you think of Play as your definitive work? I think it’s a lovely little record. If I’m being honest, I like the second half so much more than the first. It has more depth, more nuance, more texture. When I hear songs from the first half, sure, I like some of them, but I don’t get terribly excited. “My Weakness” or some of the ones at the end, those are the ones that resonate with me a lot more on an emotional level. Dumb question: Why did you name it Play ? It was a few things. There was a park on the corner of Spring and Mulberry that had a giant mural that read “play” and I saw it almost every day. At one point I was listening to the music in a friend’s car and I thought “Wouldn’t it be funny to name the record Play so it would be displayed on any system it was playing on.” And one of my favorite bands, Magazine, with Howard Devoto, one of the original Buzzcocks, released a live album in the ‘80s called Play , a slight homage to that title. And the fourth reason is, I have always worried and anxious and possibly taken myself too seriously and calling an album Play was a reminder to not be so dark and dour and self-involved.

Bad Wolvesin Tommy Vext tulevasta albumista: "Tämä on meidän Vulgar Display Of Powerimme" (KaaosZine)

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Israelilaista metallia päivään: Walkways julkaisi tulevan ”Bleed Out, Heal Out” -albuminsa nimikkokappaleen 21.05.2019 Yhdysvaltalainen metalliyhtye Bad Wolves on saanut valmiiksi tulevan, järjestyksessään toisen albuminsa nauhoitukset. Yhtyeen seuraava albumi tullaan julkaisemaan vuoden 2019 lopussa. Yhtyeen laulaja Tommy Vext on paljastanut asian tuoreessa 102.7 WEBN:n videohaastattelussa ja kertonut tulevan albumin olevan bändin ”Vulgar Display Of Power”. Tommy kertoi levystä seuraavaa: ”We all knew what we wanted to do, and we went in and we kind of nailed it. John [Boecklin] went to Nashville and crushed the drums out there, we did [Las] Vegas and L.A., so we were all over the country recording. I’m just really happy with it, and I’m really excited for people to hear the new record. If ’Disobey’ was our ’Cowboys From Hell’, then this new record will be our ’Vulgar Display Of Power’. That’s a PANTERA reference. If you don’t know the reference, walk on home, boy.” Voit katsoa videohaastattelun tästä:

A Review: 'Classic Rock Magazine's' 100 Greatest Rock Albums | Beat

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Days of Future Passed by The Moody Blues Sheer Heart Attack by Queen Idlewind South by Allman Brothers Selling England by the Pound by Genesis Camembert Electrique by Gong Irish Tour '74 by Rory Gallagher John Barleycorn Must Die by Traffic The River by Bruce Springsteen Moondance by Van Morrison Automatic for the People by REM News of the World by Queen Images and Words by Dream Theatre Contraband by Velvet Revolver Use Your Illusion by Guns N'Roses Animals by Pink Floyd Thick as a Brick by Jethro Tull Darkness on the Edge of Town by Bruce Springsteen Fair Warning by Van Halen The Final Cut by Pink Floyd Brain Salad Surgery by ELP Argus by Wishbone Ash House of the Holy by Led Zeppelin Frampton Come Alive by Peter Frampton Heaven and Hell by Black Sabbath Queen II by Queen Close to the Edge by Yes Last Decade Dead Century by Warrior Soul Loveless by My Bloody Valentine Powerslave by Iron Maiden Mott by Mott the Hoople Korn by Korn Cat Scratch Fever by Ted Nugent Peter Gabriel by Peter Gabriel Rated R by Queens of the Stone Age Born Under a Bad Sign by Albert King Siamese Dream by Smashing Pumpkins The Downward Spiral by Nine Inch Nails 'Horses' by Patti Smith Listen to it here. Classic Rock Magazine has just told you that one of the greatest pieces of songwriting in classic rock did not make it into a top 100 albums about classic rock. I am disappointed, because this album is an amazing example of great, poetic songwriting—it is an example of an iconic album cover, and it is an example of brilliant music. Patti Smith deserved better; she deserved at least top 50. Reckless by Brian Adams Unknown Pleasures by Joy Division Second Helping by Lynyrd Skynyrd Cheap Thrills by Big Brother and the Holding Company The Pretenders by The Pretenders Sonic Temple by The Cult Pearl by Janis Joplin Kick Out the Jams by MC5 Tarkus by Emerson, Lake and Palmer Hybrid Theory by Linkin Park Marquee Moon by Television Pieces of Eight by Styx The Stone Roses by The Stone Roses Nothing's Shocking by Jane's Addiction Heart by Heart Back Street Symphony by Thunder The Bends by Radiohead Astral Weeks by Van Morrison So by Peter Gabriel 'Grace' by Jeff Buckley Listen to it here. This one hurt. I can't believe Jeff Buckley's Grace didn't make it on to the top 100. The title song is absolutely beautiful, as is the song "Mojo Pin," and his version of "Hallelujah " should be enough on its own. His cover of Bob Dylan's "Mama You've Been on My Mind " was incredible, and he has an iconic singing voice. I can't believe classic rock left him out—that is an insult. The Real Thing by Faith No More Transformer by Lou Reed Earth vs. The Wildhearts by The Wildhearts Clutching at Straws by Marillion Asia by Asia Electric Warrior by T. Rex Surrealistic Pillow by Jefferson Airplane New Jersey by Bon Jovi American Beauty by The Grateful Dead Demons and Wizards by Uriah Heep Pump by Aerosmith Seasons in the Abyss by Slayer Outlandos d'Amour by The Police The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion by the Black Crowes Raw Power by Iggy Pop and the Stooges Escape by Journey Shake You Money Maker by the Black Crowes American Idiot by Green Day Fire and Water by Free Badmotorfinger by Soundgarden Deja Vu by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young The Band by The Band Dirt by Alice in Chains Blackout by Scorpions Blood on the Tracks by Bob Dylan* *(if you're asking, yes I'm mad about this one, but I've also realised that Classic Rock Magazine seems to be very biased. So I'll leave it there). Eliminator by ZZ Top Every Picture Tells a Story by Rod Stewart In the Land of the Grey and Pink by Caravan (What's the Story) Morning Glory? by Oasis Achtung Baby by U2 No Sleep 'till Hammersmith by Motorhead Vulgar Display of Power by Pantera Aja by Steely Dan The Velvet Underground and Nico by The Velvet Underground and Nico Blues Breakers by John Mayall and Eric Clapton The Rotter's Club by Hatfield and the North Smash by the Offspring The Clash by The Clash Part 2: The Top 100 We're now going to go through the top 100, and don't worry, I'm not going to go through every single album, and see what they're doing on the list. Instead, we're going to only cover in detail the albums I disagree with the position of, and have a look at why I disagree with their position. So let us begin! 100-91 99. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers 98. Peace Sells but Who's Buying? by Megadeath 97. 'The Piper at the Gates of Dawn' by Pink Floyd This album deserves to be much, much higher than it is on this list. It is one of my personal favourite albums by the band, as it is the brain-child of the underrated genius—Syd Barrett. I would have personally placed this album at around number 15-20, if I was making a list of my own essential albums. But, on the greatest albums of all time, it definitely deserves a place in the top 50. 96. Superunknown by Soundgarden 95. 'The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway' by Genesis This one is personal, I'm not going to lie to you when I say this, but I do not like Genesis that much. Not that I don't like them at all, I just don't like them enough to put them on the top 100. It's a bit strange that they'd put The Piper at the Gates of Dawn below this, and that there are several Queen, Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin, and David Bowie albums that didn't make it, but this did. I just find that wrong. 94. Sabotage by Black Sabbath 93. Cheap Trick at Budokan by Cheap Trick 92. 'Beggars Banquet' by The Rolling Stones Again, a personal one. I thought that this album should have been a bit higher, maybe in the top 60. It doesn't deserve to be so low on the list, not when it has a song like "Sympathy for the Devil" on it. Imagine someone putting just the song "Sympathy for the Devil"at number 92 for anything. I mean as an album altogether it isn't great, but for that song alone, it deserves better. 91. The Hombres by ZZ Top 90-81 90. Blood Sugar Sex Magik by Red Hot Chilli Peppers 89. Destroyer by Kiss 88. 'Hunky Dory' by David Bowie Now, I really like this album, and I've heard people online say that this is one of the greatest albums ever recorded. I'm not going to lie, but it is probably in the top 30 greatest albums ever made—why it is so low on the scale I will never know. The track "A Song for Bob Dylan"is absolutely brilliant, and other songs on the album have gained such intense popularity—I can't imagine what was going through their heads when they decided to put this iconic album at number 88. 87. Fragile by Yes 86. 'Highway 61 Revisited' by Bob Dylan Okay, if I wasn't angry before—you can probably tell that I am now. Bob Dylan's greatest album at number 86 almost made me choke when I first read this. This album should be at number one, because it set the bar for everyone else to beat when it came to new-styled music. Bob Dylan was the first guy to make this fusion between folk and rock, between acoustic and electric, between songwriter and performer. It is quite possibly the most important album in rock history, and you all just shoved it here. As you can tell, I'm angry. 85. Operation: Mindcrime by Queensryche 84. Rage Against the Machine by Rage Against the Machine 83. 1987 by Whitesnake 82. Burn by Deep Purple 81. Ramones by The Ramones 80-71 80. Billion Dollar Babies by Alice Cooper 79. OK Computer by Radiohead 78. Seventh Son of the Seventh Son by Iron Maiden 77. Tommy by The Who 76. 'Slippery When Wet' by Bon Jovi There's songs like "You Give Love a Bad Name" and "Wanted Dead or Alive" on this album, so I don't understand why it only made 76. It is far better than 76, because really, there is not a single bad song on that album—it deserves at least a place in the top 40. I mean come on, it's Bon Jovi, and one of their most-loved albums as well. But of course, the album would not be complete without the amazing "Livin' on a Prayer" — yes that song is on the album, and yes, Classic Rock Magazine stuck it at 76. No I don't know why either. 75. Brothers in Arms by Dire Straits 74. Powerage by AC/DC 73. 'Born in the USA' by Bruce Springsteen Let me have a think about yet another album that doesn't have a single bad song on it that also sounds great as an entire album, and amazing as single tracks. Oh, I have one! It's Bruce Springsteen's Born in the USA. Why is this album at number 73, when it clearly deserves a space in the top 40? With songs like "Dancing in the Dark"and "My Hometown ," they really did just put it this low. I can't explain how upset I am by this; this album is just too good to be this low! 72. Disraeli Gears by Cream 71. Alive by Kiss 70. Strangers in the Night by UFO 69. Axis: Bold as Love by The Jimi Hendrix Experience 68. 'Pronounced "Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd"' by Lynyrd Skynyrd I like this album far too much for it to be this low in the ranking. This album does deserve its space in the top 50, because of the fact that it's more than an album—it's an icon. With songs like "Free Bird,""Mississippi Kid," and "Tuesday's Gone" — this album has no excuse being this low, and if I were Classic Rock Magazine , I would seriously rethink this one, because of the status it holds as being such a good album. 67. Live at Leeds by The Who 66. Bad Company by Bad Company 65. Live and Dangerous by Thin Lizzy 64. Layla and Other Absorbed Love Songs by Derek and the Dominos 63. Ace of Spades by Motorhead 62. In Rock by Deep Purple 61. Let There Be Rock by AC/DC 60-51 60. Pyromania by Def Leppard 59. In the Court of the Crimson King by King Crimson 58. Quadrophenia by The Who 57. Rocks by Aerosmith 56. Aqualung by Jethro Tull 55. Jailbreak by Thin Lizzy 54. British Steel by Judas Priest 53. 'Pet Sounds' by the Beach Boys Pet Sounds is one of the most iconic albums in classic rock, and really set one of those high bars for others to follow. It was a blend of 50s fusion rock and psychedelia, and The Beach Boys really outdid themselves on this one. I would've thought with a song like "God Only Knows ," and such a well-made album—this record would've made at least the top 30. Number 53 is hardly fair at all. Not for such an iconic album. 52. 'Born to Run' by Bruce Springsteen Some cite this album as one of the greatest albums ever recorded in any type of music, not just rock. Springsteen's awesome and legendary Born to Run is an icon of rock music especially 70s rock music. It has some incredible tracks, and I wager you to tell me one bad song on that album. The entire album being put together this well deserves a spot in the top 30, not as low as the fifties. Sorry, Classic Rock Magazine , but you got this one wrong. 51. 'Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols' by Sex Pistols I'm sorry, but I hate the Sex Pistols for reasons I cannot explain, please get them off the list. 50-41 50. Purple Rain by Prince and the Revolution 49. '1984' by Van Halen Again, another album that deserves to be higher on the list. Any of Van Halen's albums, for the guitar work alone—are musically brilliant, and do not deserve a space in the 40s. I would go as far as to say for the musical ability, they deserve a space in the top 20. This album especially. Now go on, and tell me which song is bad on this album; don't worry, I'll wait. 48. Let it Bleed by the Rolling Stones 47. London Calling by The Clash 46. At Fillmore East by The Allman Brothers Band 45. Master of Reality by Black Sabbath 44. 'Bat out of Hell' by Meat Loaf My mother wouldn't be impressed with this position, she loves Meat Loaf. But if you're telling me, one of the greatest selling albums in history (of any kind of music) only made it to number 44? I don't think so. The title track alone gives it the position of at least top 10. I can't say I'm surprised because Classic Rock Magazine tends to drool over Pink Floyd, and Led Zeppelin, but leaves out people like Meat Loaf. This album deserves far more than 44. 43. Electric Landlady by The Jimi Hendrix Experience 42. 'The Joshua Tree' by U2 I just really don't like U2, I'm sorry I can't explain it. 41. Toys in the Attic by Aerosmith 40-31 40. Hysteria by Def Leppard 39. LA Woman by The Doors 38. Holy Diver by Dio 37. Exile on Main St. by The Rolling Stones 36. 'Nevermind' by Nirvana I would say that this album is way too high on the list. Let's just put it this way, this album made above icons like Born to Run, Pet Sounds and Highway 61 Revisited. It even beat Bat Out of Hell to the top 40. I just really don't think it should be in the top 50. It was thoroughly average, but it didn't do a lot compared to the other albums I've mentioned in this section. 35. Ten by Pearl Jam 34. Blizzard of Ozz by Ozzy Osbourne 33. Moving Pictures by Rush 32. Hotel California by Eagles 31. Boston by Boston 30. The Black Album by Metallica 29. Sticky Fingers by The Rolling Stones 28. Who's Next by The Who 27. Rumours by Fleetwood Mac 26. The Doors by The Doors 25. 'Revolver' by The Beatles Revolver is one of the greatest albums ever made, and well, I think it deserves a space in the top 10. Songs like "Eleanor Rigby"and "Taxman"are great on their own, but including songs like "Doctor Robert" makes the album even more iconic. It is a true classic rock legend, and definitely deserves more than the top 25. I would say that this album is possibly better than Abbey Road. 24. Machine Head by Deep Purple 23. 'Aladdin Sane' by David Bowie This is a near-perfect album, and quite possibly deserves to be in the top 10. Songs like "Cracked Actor,"and the amazing "Drive-In Saturday"are incredible additions to the album. The album is an icon of David Bowie's most experimental character, and I definitely think that this album deserves more. 22. Are You Experienced? by The Jimi Hendrix Experience 21. Rainbow Rising by Rainbow 20-11 20. Paranoid by Black Sabbath 19. 2112 by Rush 18. 'The Wall' by Pink Floyd I think that this album deserves to be in the top five. The Wall isn't just an icon of music, it's quite possibly one of the most important albums ever recorded. Songs like "Another Brick in the Wall Pt.2,"and—(my personal favourite song on the album), "Mother"make this record more than just revered—it is legend. The Wall deserves much more than number 18. If I was writing this, it would definitely be top five, and top five in any genre of music. 17. Master of Puppets by Metallica 16. Ziggy Stardust by David Bowie 15. 'A Night at the Opera' by Queen Personally, I just think Innuendo was so much better, I would've put it here instead of A Night at the Opera. 14. Physical Graffiti by Led Zeppelin 13. 'The White Album' by The Beatles I would've put this in the top ten, I don't like how this very experimental and life-changing album is put so low on the scale. But, each to their own—I think they put it here, because the album isn't really well put together, and even though it has great songs on it, the whole album is a bit messy. 12. The Number of the Beast by Iron Maiden 11. Van Halen by Van Halen 10-1 10. Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin 9. Highway to Hell by AC/DC 8. 'Abbey Road' by The Beatles I would definitely swap this entry for Revolver, because of the fact Revolver is better in terms of a constant sound and story. There's definitely a lot of storytelling going on in Revolver, and in comparison to Abbey Road, everything fits together better. I think in Abbey Road, the song "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" stands out like a sore thumb, and not in a good way. 7. Back in Black by AC/DC 6. Appetite for Destruction by Guns N'Roses 5. 'Wish You Were Here' by Pink Floyd I do agree with this addition in being one of the greatest rock albums ever, but as a personal thing—I'd swap it for The Piper at the Gates of Dawn purely because I think that album did more for changing music than this one did. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn really made psychedelia more popular, and the album is a masterpiece, I feel like Wish You Were Here is more Pink Floyd being comfortable. 4. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles 3. II by Led Zeppelin 2. IV by Led Zeppelin 1. Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd