Pantera Mentions Around the Web

Pantera Negra | Novo Trailer (Legendado) | Marvel

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Bain Capital, Andreessen Horowitz confirm investment in new crypto-currency | News | WIN 98.5

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Bain Capital, Andreessen Horowitz confirm investment in new crypto-currency Monday, October 16, 2017 12:44 p.m. EDT NEW YORK (Reuters) - Bain Capital Ventures and Andreessen Horowitz have participated in the pre-sale of a new crypto-currency called basecoin, the companies have confirmed. Basecoin will be created by three Princeton University computer science graduates, according to Intangible Labs chief executive officer and co-founder Nader Al-Naji on Friday. Intangible Labs is the creator of basecoin. It's one of many blockchain start-ups creating and distributing tokens to investors to raise funds for their projects. Start-ups typically hold a token pre-sale to institutional investors before opening the token offering to the public. Aside from Al-Naji, the other founders of Intangible Labs are Lawrence Diao and Josh Chen. Bain Capital and Andreessen Horowitz confirmed their investment in basecoin in an email to Reuters late on Friday. Digital Currency Group also confirmed its participation in the basecoin presale. The other investors who invested in basecoin were Pantera Capital, AngelList CEO Naval Ravikant, PolyChain Capital, 1confirmation, and MetaStable Capital, Al-Naji said. Those investors were not immediately available to comment. (Reporting by Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss; Editing by Andrea Ricci) More From Technology

Bain Capital, Andreessen Horowitz confirm investment in new crypto-currency | News | MIX-FM

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Bain Capital, Andreessen Horowitz confirm investment in new crypto-currency Monday, October 16, 2017 12:44 p.m. EDT NEW YORK (Reuters) - Bain Capital Ventures and Andreessen Horowitz have participated in the pre-sale of a new crypto-currency called basecoin, the companies have confirmed. Basecoin will be created by three Princeton University computer science graduates, according to Intangible Labs chief executive officer and co-founder Nader Al-Naji on Friday. Intangible Labs is the creator of basecoin. It's one of many blockchain start-ups creating and distributing tokens to investors to raise funds for their projects. Start-ups typically hold a token pre-sale to institutional investors before opening the token offering to the public. Aside from Al-Naji, the other founders of Intangible Labs are Lawrence Diao and Josh Chen. Bain Capital and Andreessen Horowitz confirmed their investment in basecoin in an email to Reuters late on Friday. Digital Currency Group also confirmed its participation in the basecoin presale. The other investors who invested in basecoin were Pantera Capital, AngelList CEO Naval Ravikant, PolyChain Capital, 1confirmation, and MetaStable Capital, Al-Naji said. Those investors were not immediately available to comment. (Reporting by Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss; Editing by Andrea Ricci) More From Technology

Minneapolis music venue Triple Rock closing

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By Ross Raihala / St. Paul Pioneer Press Today at 5:46 p.m. Triple Rock Social Club will close after Thanksgiving 2017. Photo courtesy triplerocksocialclub.com MINNEAPOLIS — After 19 years in the business, Minneapolis concert venue the Triple Rock Social Club will close after Nov. 22. The club announced the news on its Facebook page Monday afternoon, but did not mention a reason. "We want to thank all the customers, bands, and artists who have been a part of this place over the years," read the post. "We still have a lot of great events coming up, so come on down and celebrate The Triple Rock!" Dillinger Four guitarist/vocalist Erik Funk and his wife, Gretchen, opened the Triple Rock as a bar in 1998 and added a concert stage in 2003. It earned a nationwide reputation among touring bands thanks to the Funks' commitment to treating musicians fairly. The Triple Rock is mentioned in songs from Motion City Soundtrack ("Better Open the Door"), Doomtree ("Bangarang") and Limbeck ("Home Is Where The Van Is"). Los Angeles punk band NOFX paid tribute to the venue in the 2006 single "Seeing Double at the Triple Rock" and shot the video on site. The club's calendar of shows is packed and includes the Hold Steady's Craig Finn (Friday), classic punk band the Dead Boys (Sunday), a tribute to Pantera guitarist Dimebag Darrell (Nov. 4) and indie rocker Ted Leo (Nov. 11).

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0:00 OMG!! WALK BY PANTERA!! 0:06 Oh, it's Korn... WAIT, IT'S FUCKING KORN!!!

Interview: Max Cavalera talks sobriety, Nailbomb, playing with his son

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Interview: Max Cavalera talks sobriety, Nailbomb, playing with his son Posted by El Prezidente Max Cavalera is metal 24-7. dread-headed and always sporting a band t-shirt, he produces albums annually with either Soulfly or the Cavalera Conspiracy. And let’s not forget his work in Sepultura, which has well withstood the test of time. Though always pushing forward, last year Max and his brother Igor decided to get nostalgic performing their Roots album for it’s 20th anniversary in it’s entirety. This year Max has decided to perform another of his past albums in its entirety live, and not as obvious a choice as Roots . Point Blank, by his side group Nailbomb (featuring Alex Newport formerly of Fudge Tunnel now a famed English producer), is a more underground gem. It’s cover, a close-up photo of a Viet Cong woman with a U.S. military machine gun to her head, was a jarring thing to see at a Sam Goody Record store in 1994, and the music was just as jarring a blend of hardcore punk, metal, and industrial. It fully established Max’s attitude, his attraction to experimentation and tendencies toward dense grooves. Though Alex Newport is not involved, Soufly has started performing Point Blank for the first time in it’s entirety live throughout the U.S.. I (El Prezidente) recently spoke with Max just before the tour kicked off about performing the album, throwing a mic stand at his sound guy, having his son in the band on the road and more. Listen to the entire chat below. How’s it going? Good man. We’re concentrating on Nailbomb right now, It’s gonna be great. We’re practicing and it’s fantastic, I think it’s gonna be so cool to play some of the songs we never played before like “24 Hour Bullshit,” “For Fuck’s Sake,” the practices are sounding insane cool so it’s gonna be a great show. The album was made to play live, there’s so much energy on that record. I was going to ask you that, it’s cool to make these shows special and tackle a full album but sometimes every track isn’t built for the live setting or the sequencing might have to change a little. Will you mix up the sequence of the record? Well we’re planning to play the whole record as it is, and then we’re gonna add some stuff like the 2 tracks from “Proud to Commit Commercial Suicide” which was “Zero Tolerance” and “While You Sleep, I Destroy Your World” which was a Charles Manson song, and then probably “Police Truck” the Dead Kennedys cover, probably do a new one of that, and then some other stuff I don’t know yet. I was thinking about doing a cover song with all the bands that are on the bill, we’ve got Cannabis Corpse, and Noisem, and Lody Kong. So we’ll do a really cool punk song or metal song together with everybody at the end. It’d be cool to end the show with that. But the Point Blank record is gonna be insane cool, it is a really interesting record I think, it’s got so much energy song to song. It was done at the right time even playing in the order of the record. It makes sense, the songs flow. You have the fast beginning and real low slow songs like “Sum of Your Achievements” and then you have the crazy stuff like “World of Shit” and “Religious Cancer.” “For Fuck’s Sake” is kinda like a Nine Inch Nails meets thrash metal. It’s great, it’s a kick ass record, I’m so excited to play this stuff live. And will there be time for any classic Soulfly songs? I think some of the shows we’re gonna need to play more songs, I think we’re go throw in some of the Soulfly favorites like “Blood, Fire, War, Hate” and “Primitive,” “Eye for an Eye,” just stuff that people really love, with some of the cover songs we’re working on. It’s gonna be a full night of metal, I think everybody’s gonna be happy with it. You told me in a previous interview you don’t listen to your old records, is this a chance for you to get nostalgic with your own catalog and how hard was it to relearn everything if you haven’t heard it in so long? Yeah. I had to go back on this one and relearn, I was surprised some songs were actually in E standard, it’s the tuning of early stuff like Beneath the Remains and Morbid Visions and Schizophrenia and some of the other stuff was in D like the Chaos A.D. tuning. But the riffs are really great like the “24 Hour Bullshit” riff is like us and Dino (Cazares) did that one together from Fear Factory, it came out so heavy. We tried to reproduce everything all the sounds you hear on the album. I went to the master tapes and got the sounds out of the master tapes so they can be played together when we play live, so it’ll be really close to the record. I’m excited to check you guys out at the Gramercy Theatre show in NYC Sunday Oct. 22nd, I missed you the last few times you came to New York. Yeah, I think the package is cool having Cannibas Corpse, Noisem, and Lody Kong it’s kind of more of an underground metal package which I think is great. The Roots tour was really big, a lot of big festivals. Nailbomb is different, it’s more underground it’s more for the real fans, it’s gonna have a different feeling to it I think. The practices are sounding great. The hardest part is waiting for the tour to start, we’re very excited this thing is gonna be so much fun. So I went to see Danzig this past weekend, it was an awesome show, with Corrosion of Conformity it was a great bill. But Danzig gets on stage and his mic is feeding back horribly, you can’t even hear him. I see him mid way through the second song look at the sound guy, and I can see him mouth the words, “I’m gonna fuck you up!” I’m wondering what’s the worst technical difficulty you ever had at a show and did you ever get really pissed off and come close to blows with a sound guy or a stage hand? Oh yeah! I made our monitor guy toothless once. Oh really!? I threw a whole mic stand at his head and it hit his tooth and broke his front tooth. (laughs) But we’re really good friends, we got drunk at night we squared it off you know. He’s like “it’s battle wounds,” next day we were friends again. It’s just cause everything sounded horrible it was a bad night. And he actually took the blame, he said it was his fault, he didn’t really patch the stuff right. It was half me, I mean I shouldn’t really have to throw the mic stand, I was in the wrong, but stuff should have worked better so he was in the wrong. But we’re good friends. He doesn’t tour with us anymore, he retired and only does local shows now, but he’s still a good friend of ours, and that was in the Sepultura days by the way. I wanted to talk about t-shirts, since you’re notorious for rocking other bands t-shirts. I’m a jeans and t-shirt guy, I don’t really wear much else and you seem like a camo pants and t-shirt guy. Out of all the band t-shirts you’ve had over the years, what are your top 3? It changes from time to time, I had one in the Sepultura days it was a Godflesh one, it was one of my favorite ones and my brother actually just bought me the same one again and gave it to me last month which was a great birthday present. He found the same one that I wear because I lost that one on tour. I also used to have a Napalm Death long sleeve that I really love also got lost on tour. And a Discharge, which I actually found last week I went to a record store here in Phoenix and the guy that works there knows me, he goes, “Max I put two Discharge away for you”. The guy came in here, he was a punk rocker selling all this stuff and he sold two of his Discharge stuff to the store, so he put it away and I got it. It’s so cool I’ve got two new Discharge shirts to wear. I like wearing a lot of the new bands’ stuff like Gatecreeper, Genocide Pact, Nails. The newer bands from the underground that are happening right now. That’s kinda like my favorite but I’m metal 24 hours a day. I’m not like one of these guys that goes on tour and their metal, and they come home and are totally different like Jekyll and Hyde. For me it doesn’t change much from touring to home. I’m always wearing my metal shirts at home and my camouflage pants. Will you keep a shirt around way too long, like it’s got holes in it, and is all faded? I have a couple favorite shirts that are like real soft cause you wear them so much, they become like really soft and get holes in it. So I got a Motorhead shirt that’s like that. I have a Lions shirt I wear a lot cause I’m a Detroit Lions fan. Sorry for everybody out there that hates the Lions, but I’m a big fan. Now how does that happen cause you’ve been in Arizona a while, you’re not a Cardinals fan? Yeah man you know, the Cardinals are my second team, I like them, yesterday was kinda rough, and the Lions won so, but it was kinda tough cause they’re my second team. But I had to pick a different team. That’s just me, I couldn’t be just Cardinals. It was about six years ago I started liking the Lions and became a big fan and I heard their center is really big into metal, Travis Swanson. So I’m gonna try to get in touch with him send him some stuff and hopefully I’ll get to meet some of them it’d be really cool. Yeah, that’d be great to hear some Soulfly at the stadium you know how they play Pantera and Metallica, I think your songs were built for that. Yeah I could hear them playing “Roots” that would be kinda cool (laughs). Or “Jump Da Fuck Up” Yeah, that would be great to get them excited to play, right? So your son Zyon has been in the band for a while and we were just talking about get crazy, getting into a fight with the sound guy, getting drunk. Do you still party on the road? And can you party with your son? Do you ever have to pull rank on him, like “dude, cool it! you’ve had enough!” No, not that much they’re really good, they’re way better than I was at that age. I kinda judge by that… Do you ever feel like he got robbed of that experience because his dad’s always around? I don’t know why they’re more mellow than I was. I was always really wild, I tried everything, I was crazy you know. They just like weed man, which is cool I think and it’s almost legal everywhere which is cool, it’s something you can do and it doesn’t really effect you. I think it’s better than drinking because drinking is much more dangerous and violent. I’m kinda straight-edge, you know, going on probably like 10 years. I stopped everything. I’m kind of a radical, if I do something I do everything or I don’t do nothing, so when it came time to quit I just quit everything all at once, no drugs, no alcohol, no nothing. But without preaching, I don’t like the straight-edge preaching mentality. Every person is allowed, and we have plenty of guys that party, Rizzo drinks a lot! (Marc Rizzo, Soulfly guitarist). Some of the other crew like weed and stuff like that. I’m around that and I’m fine, I got no problem with that it’s just not for me, I get high with music. Metal is what gets me high. I’m good with that. What was your rock bottom? Throwing up on Eddie Vedder? No, I continued after that (laughs) That was just part of it. I partied for a long time after that, cause that was around 95 I think. So I carried on for another 10 years after that and threw up on a lot of other people, he was probably the most famous!

Hurt or Heal: Battle of the Bands - Page 30

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Rolling Stones -2 Alice in Chains - 18 The Beatles - 18 Black Sabbath - 17 Iron Maiden - 15 Jimi Hendrix - 18 Led Zeppelin - 17 Nirvana - 13 Pantera - 20 Pink Floyd - 23 Red Hot Chili Peppers - 11 Rolling Stones - 7 Soundgarden - 21 System of a Down - 18 The Who - 11

Minn. roundup: Nikko, North America's oldest snow monkey, dies at Minnesota Zoo; Minneapolis music venue Triple Rock closing

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Minn. roundup: Nikko, North America's oldest snow monkey, dies at Minnesota Zoo; Minneapolis music venue Triple Rock closing By RiverTown Newsroom on Oct 17, 2017 at 10:28 a.m. APPLE VALLEY, Minn.—The oldest snow monkey in North America died Sunday at the Minnesota Zoo in Apple Valley. Nikko, a Japanese macaque (commonly referred to as snow monkeys), celebrated his 34th birthday in September, according to a news release issued Monday by zoo officials. Nikko nearly doubled the average life expectancy of his species, which is 18 years, the news release said. He arrived at the zoo in 2001. "It is never easy to lose an animal that you have worked with for so many years," zoo curator Tom Ness said in the release. "Nikko's age is a true testament to the amazing care we provide our animals here at the Minnesota Zoo. Nikko was a very special animal and it has been a tough few days." With the loss of Nikko, the zoo's snow monkey troop now includes 25 animals. One dead, 2 injured when house being set on foundation falls in NW Minn. KELLIHER, Minn.—One man was killed and two others injured after a home that was being placed on a foundation fell from its support on Sunday morning in northwest Minnesota, a release from the Beltrami County Sheriff's Office said. Emergency personnel responded Sunday to Shotley Township, approximately 60 miles north of Bemidji, and were able to extricate Joshua O'brien, 25, of Blackduck, from under the building and initiated lifesaving efforts, but were unsuccessful. The two injured were Christopher O'brien, 52, of Blackduck, and Matthew Hjelden, 49, of Cloquet. O'brien was transported by North Memorial AirMed to a Grand Forks hospital with unknown injuries, and Hjelden was transported by private vehicle with unknown injuries to receive medical care, the release said. The release said "a small home was being placed on a foundation when the house fell from the jacks, wood posts and cement blocks being used to lift and support the building. When it fell, it trapped one of the workers under the building." Minneapolis music venue Triple Rock closing MINNEAPOLIS — After 19 years in the business, Minneapolis concert venue the Triple Rock Social Club will close after Nov. 22. The club announced the news on its Facebook page Monday afternoon, but did not mention a reason. "We want to thank all the customers, bands, and artists who have been a part of this place over the years," read the post. "We still have a lot of great events coming up, so come on down and celebrate The Triple Rock!" Dillinger Four guitarist/vocalist Erik Funk and his wife, Gretchen, opened the Triple Rock as a bar in 1998 and added a concert stage in 2003. It earned a nationwide reputation among touring bands thanks to the Funks' commitment to treating musicians fairly. The Triple Rock is mentioned in songs from Motion City Soundtrack ("Better Open the Door"), Doomtree ("Bangarang") and Limbeck ("Home Is Where The Van Is"). Los Angeles punk band NOFX paid tribute to the venue in the 2006 single "Seeing Double at the Triple Rock" and shot the video on site. The club's calendar of shows is packed and includes the Hold Steady's Craig Finn (Friday), classic punk band the Dead Boys (Sunday), a tribute to Pantera guitarist Dimebag Darrell (Nov. 4) and indie rocker Ted Leo (Nov. 11). Litchfield salvage business burns down LITCHFIELD, Minn. — A building at R & R Auto Salvage of Litchfield was destroyed by fire Sunday, Oct. 15. A deputy checking on an alarm report at the business saw smoke coming from the shop area shortly after 6:30 p.m. Sunday. The business is east of Litchfield on Highway 12. The Litchfield Fire Department was called, and a short while later the building was fully engulfed in flame, according to a report from the Meeker County Sheriff's Office. The Litchfield, Grove City and Dassel fire departments responded to the fire. The building and its contents were a total loss. The fire rekindled shortly before 1 a.m. Monday. The Litchfield Fire Department responded and was aided by the Eden Valley, Grove City and Dassel fire departments. There were no injuries. The cause of the fire is undetermined and is under investigation. Paynesville man trapped in car for 6 hours after crash COLD SPRING, Minn. — A 63-year-old Paynesville man was trapped in his car Sunday night, Oct. 15, after a single vehicle rollover crash north of Cold Spring. Joseph Spanier was driving south on Stearns County Road 2 in Wakefield Township just north of Cold Spring when his vehicle went off the road, according to a report from the Stearns County Sheriff's Office. The vehicle struck an approach at Island Lake Road and vaulted into the air, landed and rolled. Spanier was wearing his seat belt and sustained minor injuries. He as taken to St. Cloud Hospital. However, he was trapped in the vehicle for about six hours before the crash was reported to authorities shortly before 5:30 a.m. Monday, according to the report. Also responding to the scene were Cold Spring Police Department, Cold Spring Fire and Rescue and Gold Cross Ambulance. Family wants to hire private investigator to look for missing 15-year-old son DETROIT LAKES, Minn. - A Detroit Lakes family is starting a GoFundMe to pay for a private investigator to help find their missing son. The missing boy, Parker Eastman, 15, of Detroit Lakes, was last seen on Aug. 21 in the Detroit Lakes area and is suspected of running away. "I have no idea where he is or if he's even safe," Parker's mother, Meghan Eastman, has said. According to Parker's mother, he has no cell phone, money, personal transportation or identification on him. The family hopes that a private investigator will be able to devote more time towards locating their missing son.

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Lol does a tribute to dime and pantera doesn't play cowboys from hell or cemetery gates ??

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Man, I love your covers. But, speaking as a HUGE Pantera fan, this was sub par in my opinion. I mean no disrespect, but you really screwed the pooch on this one.

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PANTERA I'M BROKEN WITH THE SAME GUITAR SOUND! : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELIqdBS5iuU

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Is he doing a pantera cover on an acoustic?

Coming To Terms With The Idea That Post Malone Is Good

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Tom Breihan @tombreihan | October 18, 2017 - 10:54 am Share < br />this article: CREDIT: Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP It was the Steve Austin podcast that did it. Once upon a time, “Stone Cold” Steve Austin was the greatest star that professional wrestling had ever known. These days, he hosts a rambling, perversely enjoyable podcast. Most of the time, it consists of Stone Cold having long conversations with old wrestling buddies about their road-trip stories and tut-tutting the wrestlers of today for doing too many moves too quickly. But one day a few months ago, Stone Cold’s guest was Post Malone, the perma-grinning sing-rapper who currently has the #1 song in America. A couple of months before that, Post Malone had worn a Stone Cold-style leather vest to the BET Awards, thus blowing up Austin’s Twitter mentions. Stone Cold, who’d never heard of Post Malone before, started following the rapper on Twitter, and a DM conversation led to Post Malone visiting the Texas Rattlesnake’s home studio and sitting down with the man. And if you can listen to Post Malone’s episode of the Stone Cold podcast and remain uncharmed, then you are a tougher person than I. “He’s an avatar of blankness, and if he’s ever going to become anything more than that, it’ll take real work.” That was something I wrote about Post Malone in a column last year. It’s still true. Stoney , the album that Post Malone released last year, is a hazy, miasmic work that pretty much dissipates whenever I put it on. It has moments of stickiness, like the single “Congratulations,” but you have to be listening close to discern anything like a personality or a point of view from it. But I did get both of those things from Post Malone’s conversation with Stone Cold. I got to hear Post Malone attempting to explain to the Bionic Redneck what an 808 is. I got to hear Post and Stone Cold bonding over listening to Hank Williams and George Strait. I got to hear Stone Cold’s slightly incredulous intonation of the term “trap folk.” I got to hear Stone Cold sincerely cautioning Post over partying too hard while on the road, and I got to hear Post sincerely receiving that advice. More than anything, I got to hear these two guys clearly enjoying being in the presence of one another. Every time Stone Cold would mention anything from his wrestling career, Post would just giggle with delight. “We love it,” he’d exult. I came out of that conversation thinking something like: “ Fuck . I like this guy.” Soon afterward, “Rockstar” confirmed it. “Rockstar,” the single that Post Malone released about a month ago, is a dumb song, but it’s the good kind of dumb. It’s a song about partying so hard that you feel like a rock star, and on its hook, Post rhymes “rock star” with “Rasta,”“shottas,” and “grrrra-ta-ta-ta-ta.” The two actual rock stars that Post mentions in the song, Bon Scott and Jim Morrison, both died long before Post himself was born. The beat, from producers Louis Bell and Tank God, is a dizzy synthetic stagger, and once the rapping ends, it takes its time dissolving into gooey nothingness. Guest 21 Savage, who gets more non-hook time than Post does on the song, talks unimpressed deadpan greasy shit. And since talking unimpressed deadpan greasy shit over pretty music is exactly what 21 Savage does best, this turns out to be a canny use of the man. As for Post himself, he howls passionately about how your girl is saying “I’m with the b nd” and how the girls in his trailer all brought a fri nd; it’s been decades since any real rock stars have cared this much about being rock stars. “Rockstar” is a meaningless trifle of a song, but it is a perfectly realized meaningless trifle. I am, admittedly, an absolute mark for any rap songs about wanting to be like rock stars. For way longer than I’d care to admit, my ringtone was “Party Like A Rock Star,” the one hit from Atlanta one-hit wonders Da Shop Boyz; anyone who worked in the Village Voice newsroom in 2007 can tell you how annoying that was. That was a good-kind-of-dumb song, too, but it was good and dumb in different ways. The lyrics of “Party Like A Rock Star” evinced a much more fun image of rock stardom than rock stardom itself could ever be: “I’m on a yacht with Marilyn Manson, getting a tan, man,”“I make it rain from the center of my guitar.” And like N.E.R.D.’s “Rock Star,” or Kevin Rudolf and Lil Wayne’s “Let It Rock,”“Party Like A Rockstar” was built on a big, processed, looped-up version of a rock guitar riff. Neither of those things is the case with Post Malone’s “Rockstar.” Post Malone has listened to enough rock music that he can talk about Pantera and sound like he has some idea about what he’s discussing, but he doesn’t try to force “Rockstar” to sound like a rock song. There are no guitars to be heard on Post’s “Rockstar.” Instead, it’s a blissed-out and self-assured ode to the no-consequences party-life, a song about numb hedonism that sounds more numb than hedonistic. I like it. I don’t love the fact that I like it, but there it is. Somehow, that song, as of Monday, is the #1 song on Billboard ’s Hot 100. When the song came out a month ago, it instantly went to #2, and it pulled that off with no video. Just this week, it inched past Cardi B and into the top spot, marking the first #1 single for both Post and 21 Savage. (Post’s previous peak was #8 with “Congratulations”; Savage’s was #12 with “Bank Account.”) This wasn’t a case of a months-long build in popularity like the one “Bodak Yellow” had. Instead, the release of “Rockstar” was an event . If streaming numbers are any indication — and I think they are, even if they’re an imperfect measuring stick — then Post Malone is one of our biggest rap stars, right up there with Drake and Kendrick Lamar. Stoney , the album that he released last year, hasn’t fallen out of the top 25 in the past nine months. If anything, it’s more popular than ever. Just this week, “I Fall Apart,” a deep cut from that album, is up to a new Hot 100 peak of #31, and it hasn’t even been a single or anything. It’s mostly a hit because of a live video of Post singing it that went viral. Stoney itself just climbed to a new peak, too. After months of hanging around the top 10, it’s at #4, and it only debuted at #6. Post Malone’s staying power is just remarkable. Somehow, in the streaming era, this guy is what people want. There’s a lot that goes into that. Like every popular white rapper ever, Post benefits from white kids identifying with someone who looks like them. And Post, with his bad tattoos and his long hair and his tendency to do live acoustic covers of entry-level ’90s alt-rock songs, really is a recognizable white-kid type; I’ve known countless dudes just like him. His music is pleasant and low-impact, and it fades into the background when you’re doing other stuff, which is something I can’t say of Kendrick Lamar’s DAMN. , the other rap album that’s been kicking around the Billboard top 10 for months. Post synthesizes genres in a way that feels unforced, like he’s fully internalized his rock and country influences, like he’s not trying to force them into his music. In a streaming era, that’s a boon; it means he can wind up on a bunch of different kinds of playlists. But I also think some of his staggering success comes from him just being a pleasant human being, a fun guy to have around. That’s what I heard in that Steve Austin podcast, and that’s at least some kind of contributing factor in him suddenly becoming this enormous star. I can’t say Post Malone deserves all he’s gotten in the past few months, but I’m happy for him anyway. FURIOUS FIVE 1. WESTSIDEDOOM –“2Stings” DOOM is nowhere near what he once was, but the pure husky grain of his voice still sounds amazing. And Westside Gunn over a diamond-hard stagger of an Alchemist beat is the sort of thing you need in your life. 2. YBN Nahmir –“Change” I like this kid. He’s got a good ear for crispy, melodic, bouncy beats, and he’s got the clearest elocution of any Alabama rapper I’ve ever heard. “Rubbin Off The Paint” is the obvious hit, but every track I’ve heard has been solid. 3. Meyhem Lauren & DJ Muggs –“Street Religion” (Feat. Roc Marciano) It’s a bit weird that Meyhem Lauren’s making a full album with Cypress Hill’s legendary producer and that the first single is pretty much just the repurposed beat from OutKast’s “2 Dope Boyz (In A Cadillac),” but it’s still fun to hear these two quintessentially New York rappers on top of a beat like that. 4. Nacho Picasso –“Temperature” (Feat. ManMan Savage) This beat is pure, glorious evilness. We need more Halloween rap music. 5. Moneybagg Yo –“Silverware” “All-white futon in the trap, you can’t even sit in there. All bluetip bullets in the glock, they don’t even ‘posed to be in there.” IT WAS ALL GOOD JUST A WEEK AGO Y’all keep bringing up money & shit man I will be at subway so fast making the fuck out of a sandwich before I stop this Black & Proud shit.

First Dimebag Darrell Album in 11 Years The Hitz EP Announced for Black Friday Record Store Day 2017 Release

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SXSW 2017 Connect! First Dimebag Darrell Album in 11 Years The Hitz EP Announced for Black Friday Record Store Day 2017 Release News Andy Lindquist October 18th, 2017 - 12:12 AM Fans of Pantera and Dimebag Darrell will be treated to a special release on Black Friday Record Store day in the form of an exclusive 12-inch vinyl EP entitled The Hitz that will be limited to 4000 copies, only available at independent record stores on November 24 th . The recordings come from Dimebag’s collection of material he recorded throughout his musical career, and this is the first time these tracks are seeing commercial release. Snippets of these songs were featured on the 2006 release Dimevision Vol 1: That’s The Fun I Have . These songs are not unreleased Pantera songs as they show a different musical side of the guitarist that was not typically showcased. On the same day Metal Blade Records will be releasing the CD/DVD combo Dimevision Vol 2: Roll With It Or Get Rolled Over , which will feature the songs from The Hitz EP along with hours of archival video footage that paint the picture of a real heavy metal icon. As the guitarist of Pantera, Dimebag redefined heavy metal in the 1990s, creating a crushing and punishing guitar style that relied on bludgeoning grooves and high levels of distortion to deliver maximum sonic impact on the listener. Over the course of numerous critically acclaimed albums, Pantera became one of the most significant and most influential acts in the world before internal tensions with lead singer Phil Anselmo tore the band apart leading to the band’s dissolution in 2003. Dimebag and his brother, drummer Vinnie Paul formed a new group called Damageplan in 2004. However, tragedy struck that same year as a mentally unstable fan walked onto the stage at a Damageplan concert and fatally shot Dimebag. Ever since his tragic death, friends and family have been working on releasing archival songs and home movie footage of the guitarist with his final album of studio recordings coming out in 2006 in the form of a collaboration with country singer David Allan Coe, entitled Rebel Meets Rebel . It has been reported that Vinne Paul is no longer on speaking terms with either bassist Rex Brown or singer Phil Anselmo, instead keeping busy and focusing on his current band Hellyeah. Anselmo has recently debuted a new black metal band, Scour while Brown has released his first solo album. Despite speculation that the group could one day reunite with Dimebag’s close friend Zakk Wylde on guitar, Vinne Paul has repeatedly shot down any possibility of that happening. The Hitz Tracklisting 2. Ain’t No Struggle 3. True

Beavis and Butt-Head Spoke for a Generation of Metalheads

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TWEET As a metal riff played in the background, the music video for Death's 1993 song, "The Philosopher," opened on a shirtless child running through the woods. Two misbehaving cartoon teenagers named Beavis and Butt-Head watched the video from their couch, ready to offer their brand of no-nonsense armchair commentary. "Hey, check it out, it's Jeremy," observed Butt-Head, a reference to the diminutive, angsty star of Pearl Jam's breakthrough single. "Did I mention that this sucks?" he chided as the video's closing chyron flashes on the screen. "Yeah, but, ya know, can't hurt to say it again," confirms Beavis. Death had done alright for themselves before they ever crossed Beavis and Butt-Head's dilapidated, rabbit-eared television. They'd been a band for ten years and their influence was so far-reaching and their body of work so critically respected that they're often credited as being one of the founding fathers of the eponymously named death metal genre. But Death never achieved the level of success of Pantera, whose video for "This Love" fared far better with the cartoon duo. The treatment given "This Love" by our perpetually parentless heroes had every element that made Beavis and Butt-Head so poignant—and highlighted everything that Death's video lacked—all together in one place just waiting to be unpacked: raging teenage hormones, suburban boredom, unmitigated rage, and tales of broken families. More to the point, Pantera was relatable. Death wasn't; they were too heady, too forward-thinking, too much a product of a bygone era, or at the very least of an unfamiliar, more urban scene. Pantera was the stuff of sprawling subdivisions, big box stores, inescapable socioeconomic stagnation, and, most importantly, anger. Lots of anger. Their members were irascible boozers and partiers from the dirty, hard-scrabble South who just happened to be good at their instruments. Death was started by a kid who grew up on the Gold Coast of Long Island, and its members were the nerds that came home from school every day and practiced their instruments for hours on end, and who would eventually push the limits of metal to include elements of jazz, fusion, and classical music. Challenging and interesting, absolutely, but if you were an American teenager at the time—aimlessly wandering through tract housing subdivisions, tipping cows on soon-to-be-subdivisions and playing baseball with a live frog outside a trailer park—which would you choose? Metal needed a savior in 1993, and with Beavis and Butt-Head, it got two. And while it may seem ludicrous to give two animated characters hatched in the imagination of creator Mike Judge's credit for resurrecting an entire subgenre of rock, consider the landscape of heavy music at the time. Hair metal had died a fiery, brutal death in the preceding two years, with the pomp and circumstance of glam swiftly replaced by the stripped-down, lackadaisical, ambivalent attitude of grunge. Thrash metal had grown old and stale, its youthful fury and aggression replaced by Bob Rock's hyper-polished production on Metallica's black album in one fell swoop. Death metal's wider fanbase failed to materialize the way the major labels thought it would when Earache Records—with its who's-who roster of Carcass, Entombed, Godflesh, Napalm Death, and more—signed a huge distribution deal with big players Columbia that ended just as quickly as it'd begun. But to a nation of angry teens and pre-teens unaware of the intricacies of metal, Beavis and Butt-Head was a portal to this evolving scene. The show was at once an influencer, a tastemaker, and an embarrassingly accurate reflection of American youth. Beavis and Butt-Head were surprisingly knowledgeable about metal and tuned into current trends for a bunch of burnouts who struggled with basic elementary school arithmetic in their high school classes. Sometimes the simple presence of any combination of fire, boobs, butts and/or generally gross stuff of the juvenile variety (poop, boogers, etc.) was enough to earn their stamp of approval. The appeal of Gwar was obvious, what with their intergalactic monster costumes that spewed blood and semen from cannons and giant prosthetic dicks on stage, while Rammstein's bombastic live show was irresistible because FUCKING FIRE! By tapping into that visceral, non-cerebral filter (or lack thereof), Beavis & Butt-Head connected with an entire generation, and shaped how metalheads processed music and formed new tastes, a connection that continues to this day. But at the same time, Beavis and Butt-Head were capable of assessing an artist's cultural worth on a more sub-conscious level. There was always something more inherently "cool" about Crowbar than Grim Reaper and Beavis and Butt-Head inherently knew that, just as today's "cool" metal culture craps on Periphery while giving bands with a whole lot of very similar musical elements like Pallbearer a pass. It doesn't take a genius to know what's cool and what isn't; perhaps those assessments are better left to those who don't over-analyze every facet of everything anyway. The duo's tentacles of influence even worked their way beyond metal and into hard rock, with Nirvana, Aerosmith, Primus and Red Hot Chili Peppers all appearing on The Beavis and Butt-Head Experience , a 1993 compilation CD released by Geffen Records that went double platinum. The latter's cover of the Ohio Players' "Love Rollercoaster" in the hit film Beavis and Butt-Head Do America —which has grossed over $60 million to date—became a bonafide hit, reaching number 22 on the Mainstream Top 40 Chart. Even pop star Cher got in the game, teaming up with the duo for a new version of her 1965 hit "I Got You Babe," the album's first single. Beavis and Butt-Head had a knack for being brutally honest even in praise, and sometimes a light roasting could act as their seal of approval. About Crowbar, for example, Butt-Head once joked, "They're always taking a dump," while watching their video for "Existence is Punishment," before declaring, "This music is slow and fat," a startlingly on-point assessment (even taking their physical appearance completely out of the equation). It'd be tempting to view those comments as a slight until we hear Beavis making fun of a "wuss" at the band's concert by suggesting, "His mom's waiting outside in the station wagon." That wuss, according to the gospel of Beavis, isn't cool enough to hang at a Crowbar show. Speaking of wusses, no band was more emblematic of the negative sway Beavis and Butt-Head could have than Winger, whose logo adorned the t-shirt of the duo's dorky, try-hard, tag-along neighbor Stewart, picked on and bullied relentlessly. There's been much debate about whether Winger's career tanked because of grunge or because of Beavis and Butt-Head , but this much is certain: Beavis and Butt-head forever altered the band's public perception, and Winger and the TV show are forever linked. Kip Winger still has to answer questions about it in interviews to this day, although he appears to have made peace with it . The members of Crowbar recognized the power and influence of the show well before their videos ever appeared on it, asking their record label at the time to send Mike Judge a press package in hopes of being featured, good or bad. Bandleader Kirk Windstein explains to Noisey, "We wrote something in a letter like 'We're a bunch of fat guys, have fun with it if you want, we're all about it and we think it's hilarious.' We presented it hoping that the show would pick up on it and put us on the air. We wanted them to take shots at us. As long as they rock out to it and don't say we suck, then we're happy, we don't care if they make fat jokes. That's part of the entertainment." Windstein doesn't hesitate at all when asked if the band's appearances on the show helped boost their career: "There's almost not a show that I'm at, barely a day goes by, that somebody else won't come up to us and say 'Man, I remember ya'll all the way back from Beavis and Butt-Head !' In my opinion it really worked and helped us out as far as getting the name out there." Beavis and Butt-Head always got it right. Of Iron Maiden's "From Here to Eternity" they observed that even if the band played on MTV's Unplugged , they would "never unplug the explosion machine" that made their videos so badass, a tenet that keeps the band filling arenas worldwide to this day. To Korn's very first single "Blind"—with zero hindsight of what nu-metal would become—Beavis delivered a professorial critique after intentionally making himself dizzy, proclaiming, "this video speaks less to the mind and more to the sphincter." The two heshers captured the cultural zeitgeist surrounding Metallica at the time by arguing through the duration of the two-minute clip—an eternity by Beavis and Butt-head standards—about whether the band sucks or rules (fittingly, no one really won but they do agree that Metallica isn't as cool as Gwar). With Napalm Death, the duo couldn't quite concur on whether Barney Greenway's voice sounded like it's coming out of a butt, Godzilla, or out of Godzilla's butt before they both lost interest and recounted the time they stumbled upon a dead horse (literally) and beat it (literally). "Hey look, it's another one of those heavy metal videos with a naked dude all curled up on the floor," is all you need to know about what they think of Morbid Angel's "God of Emptiness." And so on and so forth. Perhaps nothing sums up Beavis and Butt-Head's cultural bridge to the metal world better than their quintessential anthem, a singalong of which the iconic main riff would become the triumphant refrain of jubilant teens everywhere: Black Sabbath's "Iron Man." Despite asking "Where's Ozzy?" and questioning whether the man fronting Black Sabbath is actually Ozzy's son, Beavis and Butt-Head completely nailed it here, too; in 1993, who under the age of 30 gave a crap about these old geezers? Fucking no one, that's who. We can only surmise what Beavis and Butt-Head would have said about the 14 years of metal between the show's cancellation in 1997 and its brief reprise in 2011, which shifted with the times and saw the duo focusing most of their critiques on MTV reality mainstays such as Jersey Shore , Teen Cribs , and 16 And Pregnant alongside a few music videos by of-the-moment acts like MGMT and Skrillex. Of nu-metal, we can imagine their horrified faces while watching Limp Bizkit's "Break Stuff" and we can picture in our mind's eye Butt-Head delivering a swift, back-handed slap to Beavis's face for enjoying Crazytown's "Butterfly." You can bet your ass they would've had plenty to say about metalcore's good cop / bad cop vocal approach ("Why'd these guys have to ruin a perfectly good song with this bullcrap?" ), deathcore's repetitive formula of breakdowns and more breakdowns (something tells me they might've actually been into it?) or djent's over-indulgent prog riffery. Metalheads have navigated the past 20 years of metal just fine on their own, but the absence of the guiding voices of Beavis and Butt-Head was certainly felt. Everyone's a critic now, with social media and blogging dominating the music journalism space, so perhaps our protagonists would be obsolete. But everyone could use a little guidance now and then, and for a generation of metalheads—for a solid chunk of the 90s—two cartoon teenagers were those guides.

A new album, music and lyrics – interview with Shtevil

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It celebrates meeting new people and accepting new challenges in life. You want something, go and get it. Surrounding yourself with positive people will only empower that feeling. It always brings me back to a certain summer and meeting new people. I even got them to sing on the song in the studio which means a lot to me. There are so many artists and songs that mean so much to me so picking one is impossible. I love so many different types of music. It can go from Marvin Gaye to Led Zeppelin and from Willie Nelson to Pantera. One that always comes to mind is the song “Thunder Road” by “Bruce Springsteen” on the “Hammersmith Odeon, London ’75” live album. The way he tells the story and paints the pictures in his lyrics is cinematic. I can close my eyes and follow the movie in my mind. I always get goose bumps and a lump in my throat when that one comes on. “ I wanna be your moneys friend”? I’m the worst possible person with money you will ever encounter. I’ll probably never get rich, haha. It’s a song where I kinda make fun of myself and the fact how bad I am with cash. Hence the lyric, “I wanna be your moneys friend, but money ain’t got the time, I wanna be your moneys friend, but the money is yours and not mine”. It’s like I wanna tell everyone it’s not really my fault…it’s “Moneys” fault. Hehe. It’s good sometimes not to take yourself too serious. What inspired “little dress”? Sometimes I can be a little impatient, wanting stuff and feeling bad I have to wait, Or if something doesn’t go as I planned it in my head. One day I was nagging about something and my girlfriend told me to stop my “whining and crying”. That If I kept “whining and crying I should put on my little dress and go a cry like a little princess”. Hehe, so after that I had the hook to the whole song. I knocked it out on one afternoon with a co-writer Tom Lodewyckx. We had a lot of fun writing that one! When you will release a new album? We’ll be releasing the album by the end of this year digitally. We want to put out on vinyl and support the album with a tour. So far I’ve funded everything myself so I had complete control over the creative process. I want to keep having that freedom not having to make compromises so we’ll be putting up a crowd fund campaign on www.shtevil.com and all the social media so look out for that one. By helping out you’ll make a chance to have some cool rewards in return. Like exclusive music, online jams and maybe even an acoustic living room concert. And you’ll be a part of making a cool tour and vinyl album happen! “On Fire”? Yes I do. I co-wrote the song with Julie Sohier on one evening. I was in a place where I was in a romantic relationship that had no stable future at the time. But it had a lot of passion going on, we’ve all been there..hehe. She related with the topic and came up with the melody for the verse. I always wanted to have a song where the big hook was a guitar riff instead of a vocal melody. I love it when a simple riff hits you right between the eyes. Like “Whole Lotta Love”, “Iron Man”, “Smoke On The Water”… So I came up with the riff that kinda had the rhythmic structure the verse had but then WAY heavier. The whole song was written in about 30 minutes. That was a good night! Everything…I wake up and go to sleep with it. It got me through rough times. It literally picks you up when you’re down. It keeps you going, even when you don’t feel like it. It made me connect with people I wouldn’t have met otherwise. It directs my choices in life. It shaped me for big part into the person I am now. I truly believe that without it I would have been a completely different person. So much. I love looking around me and just seeing how blessed I am having such an amazing girlfriend daughter, dog, family and friends that love me no matter what. I love creating something. Making music, that goes without saying, but also cooking. I love food! Getting great ingredients and making sure the flavours match is a lot like making a good song. That and I just have a passion for eating amazing food. Haha! That’s probably one of the reasons I love coming to Italy. They are so proud and passionate about their food and heritage that it makes it easy for me to relate with them. When they do something it’s all in, 100%. I love that. Last but not least, one of the best feelings is connecting with complete strangers at a live show. Creating an atmosphere together. Cause me playing my songs isn’t enough. Seeing the people in the crowd react makes me react up to a point where we’re feeding of each others energy. That right there is true magic.

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Awesome video, and cool guitar. I remember when I was a kid, I used to hang around a guitar store and play the guitars. One day, they got in an Arbor guitar that was exactly like the Dean guitar but smaller, and it was a baby blue color with a white pinstripe all around the edges. This was before anyone knew who Darrel Abbot was. I'm not even sure they had started Pantera yet. I never even knew there were Dean guitars. The store carried a lot of Fenders and Gibsons and cheap guitars like something like a Phoenix guitar. I could have gotten that guitar, but I chose a Guild. 🙂


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